maandag 5 november 2012

Interview by FastCompany

Hassani explains that for the past 60 years, mine removal techniques have stayed largely the same. “Local people are often the ones doing it,” he tells Co.Design over the phone. “Those who need the money. A lot of people end up getting hurt.” Typically, the professional removal of a single mine costs around $1,200, and can take days. In contrast, Mine Kafon will cost around $40 when it’s put into production, and can sustain up to four explosions before needing to be replaced. The system has undergone two years of testing, mainly at the hands of the Dutch government, who put Mine Kafon through a series of strength tests. Eventually, a full-scale mockup was tested in the deserts around Morocco (a documentary about the trip is forthcoming).


This week, the team exhibited Mine Kafon at the Dutch Design Week, and Hassani says he plans to launch a Kickstarter in a few weeks. The proceeds will fund the next round of testing, and hopefully, a finalized design ready for implementation. He’s also prototyping a similar device that can be controlled by a remote sensor, plus a cylindrical version of Mine Kafon that is modular, making it possible to create a long, rolling sweeper. Though he hopes to deploy the first Mine Kafon in his home country, he says the team is also looking to implement the device in North Africa, as well as Angola, which is riddled with more undetonated mines than Afghanistan.

More on the Kickstarter launch to come. In the meantime

Read the article here




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